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Broadstairs development causes anger

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Broadstairs development causes anger

RESIDENTS in a Broadstairs street are living within the shadow of a giant extension branded the face of the Eiger living around the internet site in Granville Road met on Monday to strategy opposition to an extension that has gone beyond its preparing agreement.

Stephen Day of Wrotham Road, whose home backs on towards the development, mentioned: can visualize the effect on myself and my neighbours this has had it like living at the bottom the north face jackets on the Eiger north face hunting up in amazement at its cold uninviting face casting a shadow over all of us. No alot more sun, no much more sea views, just doom and gloom. the application for a threestorey extension was approved by Thanet council in 2008 immediately after an earlier program for a twostorey extension was rejected.

Cllr Chris Wells represents Viking Ward and met with residents. He said: have been a district and parish councillor for this location considering that 2003, but have under no circumstances observed the amount of north face men pure anger displayed by impacted residents just before. They feel trapped in what feels just like the plot of a Disney cartoon, when a seemingly straightforward conversion becomes a giant looming blight on all their lives. Rigden, director of Urban Surveying and Style, which has been responsible for the planning application, said: have applied for retrospective preparing permission. I hope we can demonstrate you will find mitigating circumstances to think about. It can be now within the hands of your council. Short article End >

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Latest Activity: Nov 12, 2016

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