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Nature Defeated 1 more X?..Cantilevered Houses

Home of the Architect Warren Schwartz.

Cantilever is a clumsy word, reflecting a basic problem for designers - how to achieve a satisfactory appearance from an unit which includes two types of structure, cantilever and suspended span. The requirements of these are completely different.  Perhaps only on the grand scale of this unit can the builders get away with it.

The three-bedroom home climbs to more than 30 feet, 45 to be exact, 14 feet off of the ground, with views across the wooded hills and a rooftop terrace.

A slim, 17 X 90-foot rectangular volume of glass and steel, the house slopes down a hill before dramatically cantilevering for 45 feet. The great room floats 14 feet above the ground and has walls of glass on three sides. Frosted glass walls separate the 12 X 11-foot bedrooms from the hallway and translucent, honeycombed plastic doors slide away to reveal en-suite bathrooms.

"I wanted everything to be very light in color, light in structure, and feel as much as possible like floating," said Mr. Schwartz.

The cantilevered space is counterbalanced by a massive concrete basement hidden in the hillside.

 

So with this representation of Modern Architecture, was nature defeated one more time by this Boston Architect.

I just have to add, I did found this house to be a beautiful result of what we called Architecture. These structures are highly based on torque and rotational equilibrium. This type of construction lends itself well to balanced cantilever construction where the unit is built in both directions from a single support. Well done for the accomplishment, Mr. Architect. Thought

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tags: Warren Schwartz, architecture, cantilever, designers, house

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Comment by Springer on February 17, 2011 at 10:58am
Wow.  I think Schwartz wonderfully accomplished his goals with this! :)

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