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The term "Organic Architecture" was coined by the famous architect, Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959), though never well articulated by his cryptic style of writing:

"So here I stand before you preaching organic architecture: declaring organic architecture to be the modern ideal and the teaching so much needed if we are to see the whole of life, and to now serve the whole of life, holding no traditions essential to the great TRADITION. Nor cherishing any preconceived form fixing upon us either past, present or future, but instead exalting the simple laws of common sense or of super-sense if you prefer determining form by way of the nature of materials..."
- Frank Lloyd Wright, an Organic Architecture, 1939.

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Comment by Jack Bid on May 12, 2010 at 12:09pm
I love the concept of organic architecture. But these organic shapes... how do you measure them? Is there a standard method to measure odd shapes? How would an engineer on the ground build something like this?
Comment by JOHN KINUTHIA KARIITHI on May 7, 2010 at 11:53pm
I salute Arch James and agree with him totally on the neighbourhood context and the monopoly in the skyline. However, the element of environment could have been well addressed if the designer did what arch Richard Cook had done in (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bank_of_America_Tower_(New_York_City))

The design of the building will make it environmentally friendly, using technologies such as floor-to-ceiling insulating glass to contain heat and maximize natural light, and an automatic daylight dimming system. The tower also features a greywater system, which captures rainwater and reuses it. Bank of America also states that the building will be made largely of recycled and recyclable materials.[3] Air entering the building will be filtered, as is common, but the air exhausted will be cleaned as well.[4] Bank of America Tower is the first skyscraper designed to attain a Platinum LEED Certification.
Comment by Arc Chigozie James O on May 7, 2010 at 4:36pm
It could be facinating for some people who are not key players in the built environment but when relating it to its neighbours u really put up a very serious question if the local planning authorities really did some environmental impact assessment before approving the construction of such a project, i happens to be dominating the entire skyline and rendering all other structures around it far and near insignifican.

Arc. James
Comment by Ron Mauger on May 7, 2010 at 3:18pm
Just found you and wondering what is your mission/function , social, educ, or just fun ??
Comment by JOHN KINUTHIA KARIITHI on May 7, 2010 at 3:18pm
This is purely organic and could as well be eco-friendly design. The concept is quite beyond post modernism. I only wonder how this would relate to the neighbourhood context.

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